Leadership

During my various assignments in the church I attended quite a few leadership courses and seminars. I read many books on leadership skills. I have at times even taught modules in leadership seminars in various places in the world. At present I am involved with a Master’s program in Leadership that is provided by the Newbold College of Higher Education and Andrews University. Mature students—for the most part in positions of leadership in conferences and unions in Europe—come together for a few weeks twice a year over a three-year period to attend lectures. In addition, they do a lot of reading and must write a series of papers, and a thesis or project report. The group is divided into a number of ‘learning groups’ of 6-8 persons, who regularly meet and support each other. Each learning group has an ‘advisor’ who functions as a coach.  I was asked to be one of these advisors. My ‘learning group’ consists of seven persons: one from the Netherlands, two from Germany and four from the UK. In 2018 we meet during the two general lecture sessions: one is currently taking place at Newbold College and one will take place in the autumn in Riga (Latvia).  My group tries to meet monthly, alternating between Rotterdam, Düsseldorf and somewhere in the UK.  It is an interesting experience to be part of this program. I am learning many things myself. It is fun to meet so many people from all over Europe. And it is satisfying to also contribute in a modest way.

But as I am spending long days in this leadership course, I cannot help also asking myself some questions. One of the big questions that I cannot shake off is:  Does this type of course really produce the kind of leaders that the Adventist-day Adventist Church needs?  And, if it does, is there any certainty that these leaders do actually get into the main leadership positions, especially in the higher echelons of the church?

There is no doubt that leadership training is of great importance and in the past ten days I have once again seen how it positively affects the participants. But there are things an Adventist leader cannot learn by reading books on leadership models and the other themes that tend to be part of leadership training. The church needs leaders who not only have skills that can be taught and learned, but who are also able to guide the church in translating its ideals and its message into words and initiatives that resonate with a 21stcentury audience. So the question I am struggling with is: How do we make that happen?

And then there is the other question: What needs to happen to ensure that real leaders, who can lead the church in innovative ways and break through the hierarchical and often authoritarian patterns of church administration, are elected when our nominating committees meet to select leaders? I do not know how that can happen. Our structures are not conducive to make this a reality.  We must pray as never before that the Spirit of God may move us forward and will give us talented, well-trained leaders, who can lead the church into the future with ‘present truth’ that is repackaged for a new generation and who can also inspire all those who at present do not feel inspired by their church (see my previous blog).

 

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